How do I survive a day?

How do I survive a day?

How do I survive a day?,” he said. “If you just stick with it and manage your emotions, you’ll be okay.”
. When I’re having a bad day, I’m reminded that I’m not the bad guy’s nemesis. When I’re flustered, I’m reminded that I’ve got the support system I need. When I’re angry, I’m reminded that I’ve got strength and wisdom to lean on. When I’m sad, I’m reminded that there’s really not much else to be sad about.
When I’m having a bad day, I’m reminded that I’m not the enemy. When I’m flustered, I’m reminded that I’ve got the support system I need. When I’m angry, I’m reminded that I’ve got the support system I’ve earned. When I’m sad, I’m reminded that there’s really not much else to be sad about.
When I’m having a bad day, I’m reminded that I’m not the enemy. When I’m flustered, I’m reminded that I’ve got the support system I need. When I’an angry, I’m reminded that I’ve got the support system I need.

How do I survive a day? By eating, of course. And what happens when I don’t have the energy to make it through the day? I’ll describe one such day in my own life and then share how I dealt with it. Hopefully, you’ll try it when your next rough day rolls around.
A few months ago, I woke up not having slept well the night before. Despite feeling lousy, I knew I had a doctor’s appointment that afternoon with a specialist whom I needed to see. Not only that, but I’d have to drive myself to the appointment (about 45 minutes each way), because my husband had a longstanding obligation he couldn’t cancel. At least, I’d be able to take a good long nap before I had to leave for the appointment.
Unfortunately, at about 10 a.m., I began to feel pain in my bladder. Within minutes, I knew from past experience exactly what was happening: I was coming down with a bladder infection. I know the signs well. My primary care doctor and I have worked out a protocol for handling this when it happens: I have antibiotics on hand; I begin taking them once I’ve collected a urine sample to take to the lab sometime that day.
First, I realized there’d be no delivering of a sample today. The appointment with the specialist was in the opposite direction from the lab—and in a different city. I couldn’t go both places on my own. I’d have to leave work early.

How do I survive a day? By thinking clearly and acting rationally. A day in the life is a day in the soul. -Dr. Seuss

I wake up not only exhausted but also confused. Why is my body so tired? Am I having a bad night’s sleep? Am I having a bad day’s sleep? I’m not going to the doctor, am I? I’m dying. I’m dying. -Dr. Seuss

I’m not sure how to feel about this. I’m used to dealing with the pain and suffering of my injuries; now I’re dealing with the unexpected. I’m in pain. I’m sick. I’m tired. What’s the best way to deal with both of these things? -Dr. Seuss

This is a hard one. You’re not going to make it. You’re not going to survive this day. You’re not going to be able to move, talk, or feel anything. Your body is telling the truth about how tired it is, and this is not good. Your body is telling the truth about how sick it is, and this is not good. Your body is telling the truth about how tired it is, and this is not good. Your body is telling the truth about how tired it is, and this is not good. Your body is telling the truth about how tired it is, and this is not good.

How do I survive a day? One thing I know for sure is that it’s not going to be an easy day. So, for the next few hours, you’re going to be my go-to person when I’m having a bad day’s sleep.
. When your mind is foggy, your senses are overwhelmed. Your heart rate and breathing pattern are out of whack, and you’re quickly in trouble. The more you know about your body, the better equipped you’ll be to manage those rough patches.
. When your mind is blank, thoughts and feelings are difficult to break free of. They’re usually based on past experiences or on past thoughts. If you’re having a bad day’s sleep, try to break free of the pattern of thoughts and feelings by: 1. Saying to yourself, “I’m not going to the store today,” 2. Expressing your needs for food and water (for example, with a simple “Thanks for the heads-up,” or by calling a friend or relative),” 3. Giving yourself the benefit of the doubt (ie., believing that you’ll make it through this one) and accepting that maybe you’re not going to make it through this one. I’m talking about coming to terms with the fact that you’re not going to be able to do as much as you’d like to do, and accepting that this is going to be a while.

How do I survive a day? By thinking through my next move, I can make the most of each day and make it through this one without becoming a bitter, 8-hour, sleepless night.
A few years ago, I decided to give up the day-to-day grind of my day-to-day life and dedicate myself completely to health. For the first time in my life, I knew I could have a normal, happy, healthy life. My pain had become a thing of the past; I could feel the energy and connection returning to my body.
This past year has been hellish. I’ve been through two operations; one on my bladder and one on my pelvis. Both were necessary; they will require X-rays and other tests. After surgery, I experienced pain in my bladder that I didn’t feel was related to the amount of pain I was in. I know the pain is normal; it’s just that I’m beginning to feel the effects of a degenerative disease. My fibromyalgia is a real thing; it gets better with time.
Over the past few months, I’ve tried everything I could think of to ease the pain. I tried everything from making light meals and moving around to more intense exercises and diets. Nothing worked. I cringed when I ate, and groaned when I ate. I know the signs are there; it’s a fibromyalgia thing; it gets better with time. But what I didn’t expect to be doing is dealing with the consequences of my poor judgment.

Close Menu