How long does a conviction stay on a DBS?

How long does a conviction stay on a DBS?

How long does a conviction stay on a DBS?
A conviction will stay on a DBS check for as long as the police believe it should. However, if you were convicted of more than one offence, the offences will be filtered out of the check. The offences that are not eligible to be on an enhanced DBS check are:
BMI is the Body Mass Index. It is a screening tool that helps employers to decide whether an individual is a fit candidate and, if so, how long they will keep it on file.
It is possible for a screening tool to give an incorrect result. For example, the Personal Referral Service (PRS) algorithm could give an incorrect result if you have been referred to them by your local police force.
A criminal record is information held on the police that identifies individuals who should not be contacted by employers. Disclosure of a criminal record automatically opens an employer’s door to other attacks and could harm an individual’s chances of securing employment.
Sometimes details of your criminal record won’t appear on your disclosure certificate. This happens when the police do not have the information they need to identify you.
If the police believe information is relevant to the role you’re applying for and you are asking for their records, you legally need to disclose the information. Otherwise, the police will never know if you have any unspent convictions.
Sometimes details of your criminal record won’t appear on your disclosure certificate. This happens when the police do not have the information they need to identify you.
Sometimes details of your criminal record won’t appear on your disclosure certificate. This happens when the police do not have the information they need to identify you.
Sometimes details of your criminal record won’t appear on your disclosure certificate. This happens when the police do not have the information they need to identify you.
Sometimes details of your record won’t appear on your disclosure certificate. This happens when the police do not have the information they need to identify you.

How long does a conviction stay on a DBS?
A conviction will stay on your DBS record after 11 years if you are over 18, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 6 years if you are under 18, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 4 years if you are under 18, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 3 years if you are under 18, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 2 years if you are under 18, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 1 year if you were under 18 when you committed the offence, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 10 years if you were under 18 when you committed the offence, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 5 years if you were under 18 when you committed the offence, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 4 years if you were under 18 when you committed the offence, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 3 years if you were under 18 when you committed the offence, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.
A conviction will not stay on your DBS record after 2 years if you were under 18 when you committed the offence, or if it was 25 years ago when you committed the offence.

How long does a conviction stay on a DBS?
A new conviction is ‘spent’ automatically when a person is over the age of 18. This includes when the person has been formally cautioned, and an enhanced caution when a young person under 18 years old gives informed consent.
If a caution is not automatically spent, an employer must request an enhanced check to ensure the applicant is not over 18 at the time of the caution. If the applicant is over 18 at the time of the caution, the applicant will have a defence of competent reasonableness if the applicant can show that:
Under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Retention of Offenders Certificate) Order 1975 (2013) the age of majority for sexual activity was changed from 13 to 16, and from that age onwards, the duration of a custodial sentence of more than 6 months reduced by 5 years, whichever comes first.
This includes allegations made on or after 1 January 2013, when the Sexual Offences Act 2003 was implemented, unless the alleged offence is eligible for filtering under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 Claimant Protect and I will do a case-by-case analysis of the allegations.
 complains that she was sexually abused as a child, and that she was sexually abused by a senior police officer, and that the behaviour continued after the applicant had completed her police training.
 complains that she was sexually abused as a child, and that she was sexually abused by a senior police officer, and that the behaviour continued after the applicant had completed her police training.
 complains that she was sexually abused as a child, and that she was sexually abused by a senior police officer, and that the behaviour continued after the applicant had completed her police training.
 complains that she was sexually abused as a child, and that she was sexually abused by a senior police officer, and that the behaviour continued after the applicant had completed her police training.

A fresh conviction is a fresh allegation which has not gone to trial. It is a fresh allegation which has not been disclosed to the police.
It is possible for a police caution to be ‘mistakenly disclosed’ – this is when a police officer gives a false or misleading statement in order to look like they are giving information about a criminal allegation but in fact they are not.
Sometimes a caution will also show up on a DBS check after an investigation has completed. This is called a ‘further inquiry’ and occurs when police believe there is more information to share with the further community.
If police believe there is more information to share they will disclose it either formally or inform the person of their right to a private meeting with the police. If police do not disclose the caution, the person has the right to a meeting with the police where they can object and say that information is not true and that they should not be informed.
Sometimes a caution will show up on a DBS check after an allegation has been made but before a prosecution is launched. This is called a ‘complaint’ and occurs when police believe there is more information to share with the police.
Sometimes a caution will show up on a DBS check after an allegation has been made and before a defence can be argued. This is called a ‘defence suggestion’ and occurs when police believe there is more information to share with the police.
Sometimes a caution will show up on a DBS check after an allegation has been made and before a prosecution can be argued. This is called a ‘complaint’ and occurs when police believe there is more information to share with the police.
Sometimes a caution will show up on a DBS check after an allegation has been made and before a prosecution can be argued. This is called a ‘complaint’ and occurs when police believe there is more information to share with the police.

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