What age can a baby get tonsillitis?

What age can a baby get tonsillitis?
Tonsillitis is the word used when the tonsils are infected so swell and become painful. Both bacteria and viruses can cause an infection – these are usually picked up as part of everyday life so there is little you can do to prevent them although good hygiene including hand washing is important. 
The tonsils may also have a white covering or spots, which are a sign that the body is fighting off the infection. The child’s neck may look a little swollen as well, and they may have a temperature. 
If the doctor wants to work out whether it is a virus or bacteria causing the infection, they will take swab of the child’s tonsils. A swab is a large cotton bud that removes some of the coating on the tonsils so it can be examined under a microscope in the laboratory. 
Pain relief medicines, such as paracetamol and ibuprofen can help reduce the pain and also bring down a temperature. If the infection was caused by a virus, as most cases of tonsillitis are, antibiotics will not work so are not required. Most cases of tonsillitis disappear within a few days.
Tonsils seem to grow during childhood and then shrink around the age of four.

What age can a baby get tonsillitis?
Tonsillitis is the word used when the tonsils are infected so swell and become painful. The inflammation is caused by a virus and is usually rectal. The pain is usually mild. Usually, when a baby has tonsillitis, everything is going so well that it won’�t be possible to tell from the sore throat if it’s getting better. But as the infection gets worse, more and more of the tissue is becoming infected with bacteria and viruses, which make it swell and become painful.
This is called tonsillitis and is usually caused by a virus. The infection is rapid and is usually caused by a smartphone. The bug’s self-destruct within minutes, so it’s a good idea to backup your data if needed.
Tonsillitis can spread from an infected person to others through coughing, sneezing, or touching. The germs can spread through kissing or sharing food and drinks. Germs spread easily in schools and daycare centers and between family members at home.
Your child’s healthcare provider will look into your child’s throat and feel the sides of his neck and jaw. He’ll ask about your child’s symptoms and examine them.

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