What Latin American countries celebrate Day of the Dead?

What Latin American countries celebrate Day of the Dead?

What Latin American countries celebrate Day of the Dead? Where is the Halloween spirit?
In Mexico, Day of the Dead is known as El Día de los Muertos or the night of the dead.  This is the time when families go from celebrating one another’s loved ones to burying their loved ones.  Many people in Mexico City, Mexico visit the cemeteries to visit the graves of their family and friends.
in Spain, the Day of the Dead is known as El Dia de los Muertos or the dawn of the dead.  This is the time when families start to gather and visit the cemeteries to remember their loved ones.
in Canada, the Day of the Dead is known as El Dia de los Muertos or the night of the living.  This is the time when families start to celebrate and visit the cemeteries to remember their loved ones.
in the United States, the Day of the Dead is known as El Dia de los Muertos or the night of the living.  This is the time when families start to celebrate and visit the cemeteries to remember their loved ones.
in Australia, the Day of the Dead is known as The Day Of the Dead is celebrated on November 2.  This celebration is called as such because the ancestors of the celebrating families had died some time prior to the celebration.  The night of the dead is known as the night of the a**s.  This is the time when the dead are awakened from their eternal sleep and begin to roam the earth, seeking food and entertainment.
in Brazil, the Day of the Dead is celebrated on November 9.  This celebration is known as such because the
in the Phillipines, the Day of the Dead is known as The Day of the Dead is celebrated on November’s
in the Czech Republic, the Day of the Dead is celebrated on November’s
or Night of the Dead.  This is the time when people in the community come together and remember their loved ones, friends, and family members with offerings of food and drink.
in Slovakia, the Day of the Dead is celebrated on November 2.  This celebration is known as such because the
in Hungary, the Day of the Dead is celebrated on November 9.

What Latin American countries celebrate Day of the Dead? Here are 10 that should!
1. Mexico
When you think of Mexico, what comes to mind? Well, there is no denying that the country has it’s share of colorful celebrations. From
events to celebrations honoring the dead, it is hard to go wrong with a locale that celebrates Day of the Dead. Especially when it comes to costumes, as colorful as all of these costumes are, they sure do make a statement.
2. Canada
As Halloween draws near, more and more families are choosing to dress up as their favorite spirits for the occasion. This is likely why “Ghost Week” in Canada is so prevalent these days. It is a period of celebration and remembrance following the end of the curfew” in the country following the incidents of November 1st.
3. The United States
Although the holiday is sometimes referred to as a fusion of old and new traditions, the two most recognizable Halloween celebrations in the United States are those of Mexico and Canada. These two countries celebrate Day of the Dead in very different ways, but the overall goal is the same; it is a day to celebrate the lives of those ancestors who are no longer alive.
4. Mexico
While Mexico does not celebrate Day of the Dead, the traditions do continue to exist. Many families will gather together in cemeteries to remember ancestors who have passed away young or old. The older the person, the more important the remembrance. Traditionally, the family members also visit the cemetery where their loved ones are buried and make offerings of food and drink.
5. Canada
Although the two countries do not celebrate the exact same events, the underlying traditions are fairly similar. On this day, families will make offerings of food and drink to celebrate the life of their departed loved ones. In some cases, the offerings may include, but are not limited to, bread, butter, cheese, sugar, and/or spice marigolds. In some cases, the food may be left out in the open so that the deceased can partake.
6. Day of the Skulls is a celebration dating back to pre-Columbian time in the Andes, in which families spend an entire day with the skeletal remains of relatives brought back from the grave on the third year after burial.
7.

What Latin American countries celebrate Day of the Dead?
Yes, you read that right. Mexico, for one, celebrates Day of the Dead with colorful calaveras that are prevalent in the southeast corner of the country. These traditional Day of the Dead observances are meant to celebrate the deceased who have passed on from this world. 
The Day of the Dead is celebrated in many Latin American countries where the indigenous populations mourn the deceased relatives they do not have contact with.  In Mexico, the Day of the Dead is known as El Día de los Muertos or the Day of the Dead of the Minds. 
The rituals that celebrate the deceased are part of a larger pattern of religious and cultural transformation in Latin America during the 20th and 21st centuries. This change can be seen in the way that rituals are celebrated, the way that ideas about death are re-interpreted, and the way in which people deal with the loss of family members. 
Religious texts often refer to the dead as “sons of God,” “sons of the living,” and “sons of the underworld.” 
Saints John and Pádraig Ó Muilleann wrote a book called The Souls of My Fathers, dedicated to the memory of their grandfathers who had died young. In it, they described how their grandfathers had died and been buried in an
In Bolivia, the Day of the Dead is known as Xochimilco Day, and it is believed that the dead are awakened from their eternal sleep in the fall. The souls of the dead are transported to the Northern regions, where they spend some time growing and maturing before returning to the Southern regions. The souls of the living are reestablished in their places of rest on the Day of the Dead. 
The rituals that celebrate the deceased are part of a larger pattern of religious and cultural transformation in Latin America during the 20th and 21st centuries. This change can be seen in the way that rituals are celebrated, the way that ideas about death are re-interpreted, and the way in which people deal with the loss of family members.
The rituals that celebrate the deceased are part of a larger pattern of religious and cultural transformation in Latin America during the 20th and 21st centuries.

What Latin American countries celebrate Day of the Dead?
In Mexico, Day of the Dead is known as El Día de los Muertos , pronounced “The Day of the Dead” in English.  In English, we would say that  El Dia de los Muertos is a  holiday
The roots of El Dia de los Muertos go back some 3,000 years, to the rituals honoring the dead in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica.  In the Andean regions of Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia, the rituals are celebratory of the life of the ancestors––father, grandfather, and brother––while  in the northern regions, the rituals are religious and personal.
The rituals are rife with symbolic meaning.  The more we understand about this feast for the senses, the more we will appreciate it.  The rituals are rich with symbolism that goes far beyond mere physicality.  They are also rich in literary and artistic expression that perfectly describes the gravity of this day.
The Book of Mormon tells the story of how Joseph Smith, an illiterate, unskilled youth, translated the Book of Mormon from an ancient manuscript into English during a field trip to England in 1831.  Smith’s gift of translation was one of the most important events of his early career.
Smith’s mission to England was one of the most significant of his career.  He spent nearly a year translating the English translation of the Bible into English, which eventually led to the creation of the present day English-Bible.  Smith’s greatest legacy as a public speaker is his impact as a translator and Hebraic scholar.
Smith’s impact as an artist is equally impressive.  His love of nature and his love of architecture make him a natural landscape painter.  His son, Hyrum, who was born a few years after Smith, has made art out of the various animal skeletons that have been left lying around after the Great Pyramids were constructed.
Smith’s greatest literary legacy is his impact as a linguist and cultural theorist.  He is credited with bringing the concept of  regional
In addition to being a great writer, Salinas is also credited with being the personification of modern Mexican culture.  Although his native country of Mexico is celebrating Day of the Dead,  Salinas has brought his own interpretation of the holiday to the United States.

What Latin American countries celebrate Day of the Dead? How about Mexico City?
In Mexico, Day of the Dead is known as El Día de los Muertos.  The name El Día de los Muertos is Spanish for “Day of the Dead” and  Mexicano is the  Afrikaans word for “skeletons”.  El Día de los Muertos is a holiday for the remembrance of deceased family members.  It is not a celebration of devil worship”.
(Day of the Dead) is celebrated on November 1 or 2.  It is a pagan festival with Celtic and Roman origins in which sacrifices were made to the gods.  It is also the date of a 17th-century Spanish conquistador’s visit to the Andean regions of Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. 
or the Day of the Skulls is the ancient Roman Catholic ritual to venerate the dead.  It was not uncommon to see skulls of victorious soldiers on display for sale at the market.  The skulls of the defeated were replaced by those of their comrades who had died during the battle. 
or the Day of the Elegant Men is the 19th-century French revolution�s (1789-1799) celebration of the heroic deeds of the working class people.  It took place in the spring and summer of each year, to coincide with the Julian calendar.  It was a time of celebration, with processions, processions and feasts. 
or the Day of the Deceased is the Mexican celebration of the day of the departed.  It takes place in September or October according to the Khmer calendar.  It is a holiday for the respectful display of the bodies of the decedents on November 1 and 2.  It is also the date of a 17th-century French conquistador�s visit to the Andean regions of Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia.
or the Day of the Skulls is the ancient Roman Catholic ritual to venerate the dead.  It was not uncommon to see skulls of victorious soldiers on display for sale at the market.  The skulls of the defeated were replaced by those of their comrades who had died during the battle.

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